Sunny, modern flat, large windows, balconies.Palma

From $108 / night

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Description from the owner

  • Apartment
  • 3 bedrooms
  • 2 bathrooms
  • Sleeps 6

Bedrooms: 3

Bathrooms: 2

Sleeps: 6

Type: Apt. / Condo

Sunny, modern flat, large windows, balconies.Palma

Light and spacious modernized 3 bedroom apartment (140 sq.m) in Santa Catalina, Palma. Has been recently fully renovated with tasteful designer furniture and decorated with contemporary art, keeping the beauty of the original details. Situated in 'the most authentic of Palma neighborhoods', according to the New York Times, it is located in a corner art deco building from 1920 and all the bedrooms have oversized floor to ceiling windows. It is comfortable and welcoming, designed with care. There are three beautiful balconies overseeing a tree lined street. The flat has two full bathrooms and a new very bright kitchen and a separate dining room. ...Read more

About the owner

Iris

  • Response rate 100%
  • Response time A few hours
  • Calendar updated 5 days ago
  • Overall rating
    5.0 / 5.0 based on 5 reviews and 2 properties

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Sunny, modern flat, large windows, balconies.Palma
Palma de Mallorca, Balearic Islands, Spain

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Additional Location Information

The neighborhood of Santa Catalina is centrally located in Palma and is like a village of its own. It is situated on a hill with some spectacular views of the Palma bay. It has a popular market called 'Mercat de Santa Catalina' which still retains the flavor of traditional markets where you can buy typical products of the Majorcan countryside. Historically it was a fishing district because his situation was very close to the sea, this led to still retain the typical dwellings of 1 or 2 floors with balconies and facade features louvered shutters, some have a small garden that still remind us how the neighborhood was not so long ago, Santa Catalina retains the quaintness of the neighborhood of low houses and quiet streets. The neighborhood is rich in the late nineteenth century and early twentieth -cut modernist buildings of which still remain the newly renovate theatre 'Mar i Terra'. The neighborhood has all the services necessary: medical care, schools, post office, banks ... and catering establishments ranging from small, quiet restaurant or a typical neighborhood bar pub decorated with the latest artistic trends.


• 'Santa Catalina remains the most authentic of Palma neighborhoods. It is less touristed the Gothic center; artists live here, and there are a few boutiques and some new, excellent market-to-table restaurants, which have begun to draw foot traffic to the area at night. The market itself still bustles, vigorously, each morning. Bakery stalls sell ensimadas for a euro; others hawk spices, cheese, meat, poultry and, of course, fish.', wrote Sarah Wildman on the article 'Miró’s Majorca' on the New York Times.
• 'Santa Catalina, behind the harbour, is also becoming Chelseafied, although it does have a charming fresh food market where you can grab a coffee, a tapa and a picnic,' wrote Kevin Gould on The Guardian.
• 'Santa Catalina is in the process of being gentrified - although, mercifully, total gentrification is a way off - but the market is still a tremendous place to sample the real Mallorca', Kevyn Whitelaw for The Guardian.
• 'The other place I'd include is the Santa Catalina market in Palma, Majorca, where I live some of the time. A friend introduced me to it, and it has the most wonderful fish and meat stalls', Hugh Montgomery for The Independent.
• 'My usual dinner spot is over in the Santa Catalina area, next door to the neighbourhood's divine food market. I've two favourites and adore both for the same thing: meat. Carnivores will swoon at the offerings of either Es Xoriguer at Calle Fabrica 60 or Txakoli just down the road at number 14. Both pack T-Bone steak in rock salt and sear it on a scorching flame, only to serve it flesh-pink in the centre and perfectly browned on the outside'. The Hedonist at The Independent.
• To the west of the old city walls is Santa Catalina, a developing neighborhood that surrounds the lively Santa Catalina market. In the last few years, a crop of popular cafes and restaurants have turned this quarter into a fledgling foodie destination. Gisela Williams for The New York Times
• Majorca remains a choice spot for a winter weekend abroad. Easily reached and with more than 200 four or five-star hotels to choose from, the island is perfect for a few days of touring and tapas – come rain or shine.
'We get plenty of sun in winter,' says Valerie Crespi-Green, an English nurse who has lived on the island for more than 30 years and leads guided walks through the magnificent peaks of the Serra de Tramuntana. She recommends a visit in late January or early February, when the island's four million almond trees are in blossom. If there's a nip in the air, pop into a café for a reviving lumumba (hot chocolate with brandy) – or just move to another part of the island. Simply by taking a short drive south from the mountains to the sea you can find yourself swapping cardigans for short sleeves.
With its tree-lined promenades, abundant art museums, swirling Modernista architecture and cosy bars – plus a six-mile seafront cycle path for fighting the Yuletide flab – Palma is made for a stress-free city break. Nigel Tisdall for The Telegraph.
• In the buzzing Santa Catalina district, once the fishing quarter, now a little hub of trendy bistros and bars, a ten-minute walk from the centre on Carrer Fabrica. Style: Intimate, informal, chic. Daily Mail
• 'Santa Catalina remains the most authentic of Palma neighborhoods. It is less touristed the Gothic center; artists live here, and there are a few boutiques and some new, excellent market-to-table restaurants, which have begun to draw foot traffic to the area at night. The market itself still bustles, vigorously, each morning. Bakery stalls sell ensimadas for a euro; others hawk spices, cheese, meat, poultry and, of course, fish.', wrote Sarah Wildman on the article 'Miró’s Majorca' on the New York Times.
• 'Santa Catalina, behind the harbour, is also becoming Chelseafied, although it does have a charming fresh food market where you can grab a coffee, a tapa and a picnic,' wrote Kevin Gould on The Guardian.
• 'Santa Catalina is in the process of being gentrified - although, mercifully, total gentrification is a way off - but the market is still a tremendous place to sample the real Mallorca', Kevyn Whitelaw for The Guardian.
• 'The other place I'd include is the Santa Catalina market in Palma, Majorca, where I live some of the time. A friend introduced me to it, and it has the most wonderful fish and meat stalls', Hugh Montgomery for The Independent.
• 'My usual dinner spot is over in the Santa Catalina area, next door to the neighbourhood's divine food market. I've two favourites and adore both for the same thing: meat. Carnivores will swoon at the offerings of either Es Xoriguer at Calle Fabrica 60 or Txakoli just down the road at number 14. Both pack T-Bone steak in rock salt and sear it on a scorching flame, only to serve it flesh-pink in the centre and perfectly browned on the outside'. The Hedonist at The Independent.

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